Friday, 10 March 2017

University of Sydney No. 1 in the world for sports-related subjects

Ranked first in the world for sports-related subjects and best in Australia for medicine, architecture, veterinary sciences, anatomy, English language and literature.

The 2017 QS Subject Rankings, released today, rated three University of Sydney subjects in the top 10 globally (sports-related, nursing, and anatomy and physiology) and 31 more subjects in the top 50 globally, including education (11th in the world) and law (13th in the world).

Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Stephen Garton said the results were an outstanding achievement and cemented our place in the top one per cent of universities in the world.

“The breadth and depth of disciplines at Sydney is unparalleled in Australia and we are proud that so many of them have been recognised for their quality internationally.

“We are thrilled to be number one in the world in the new category of sports-related subjects, (which encompasses physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation) and among the best for many other medicine, health and humanities related subjects.

“These results cement our place as one of the best places to study and conduct research in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region.”

Professor Garton said the University would continue to strive for excellence, with a bold plan to transform the undergraduate experience and an unprecedented investment in research (a tripling of our current investment), including new funding programs to support researchers to test new ideas and world-class facilities in which to conduct research.

“We aspire to be the best education and research institution in Australia and among the best in the world,” Professor Garton said, adding that Sydney is already home to some of the world’s best and brightest students and researchers.

He pointed to Sydney architecture students who are designing Sydney’s next skyscape and Sydney dentistry students who are improving oral health and reducing obesity in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as well as our researchers who are working across traditional discipline boundaries to look at diabetes from new and more holistic angles.

The QS Subject Rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics as well as their H-index as an institution (the H-index is a metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of a publication) and citations per research paper.

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